Burger-A-Day Podcast: 3. The Phantom of the Opera

This week James Crowley and Marisa Wincowski discuss Joel Schumacher’s 2004 adaptation of Andrew Lloyd Weber’s Phantom of the Opera. They discuss the differences between the two and ask if it deserves all the hate.  Listen and subscribe wherever podcasts are found.

Also, check out our sponsor the Good Taste podcast: Good Taste Podcast

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Brian Fallon-Sleepwalkers

Where Painkillers served to bridge the gap from the crumbling Gaslight Anthem’s worst album to Brian Fallon’s solo career, Sleepwalkers sees Fallon comfortable in a singer-songwriter role.  His sophomore solo effort marks a massive step up from the previous album.  Fallon leans on the nostalgia that made him a punk celebrity, and the album is a good supplement to The Gaslight Anthem reunion this summer. Continue reading

The Wombats-Beautiful People Will Ruin Your Life

I’m standing in the Subway station waiting for the uptown train and racing to connect to the free WiFi before my train comes so I can download the first single off of the new Wombats album. It downloads as the train is pulling in and I find my seat. I always take a moment right before listening to new music from a favorite band or artist; I want to remember where I first heard a particular song or album in case it becomes of great importance to my life. I take in the blue seats and the fairly empty train car and press play. Continue reading

Kendrick Lamar (& Various Artists)-The Black Panther (Music from and Inspired by the Film)

Prepare for the Black Panther to be your new favorite Avenger.  Not only is the film opening to rave reviews, the excellent Ta-Nehisi Coates now writes the comics, and we’ve been granted worthy enough to receive this incredible soundtrack curated by Kendrick Lamar, featuring a who’s who of hip hop.  Kendrick is the reigning king of rap, and his production and choices have made this the most fun rap album to come in a long time. Continue reading

My Next Guest Needs No Introduction-Barack Obama

David Letterman takes the stage of the Amsterdam Campus of the City College of New York in My Next Guest Needs No Introduction looking more biblical than his CBS days.  Letterman comfortably sits opposite President Barack Obama. In a format more intimate than Late Night, Letterman seems at ease in this new role. Still, some things feel familiar from his light comedic tone to bringing on Paul Shaffer as the composer of this series. Continue reading

Fred Armisen-Standup For Drummers

Fred Armisen’s Standup For Drummers is the personification of your hometown “DRUMMERS IN THE [Area code]” without all the ads for local gigs or bands in need of a gig.  Armisen isn’t particularly funny; it seems like his only knowledge of standup comedy comes from movies and TV.  He isn’t really interesting or funny.  It’s full of in-jokes that can’t really provoke laughter.  The boneheaded drummer who’s unintentionally funny is one of the easiest tropes, but Fred Armisen is the hyper intelligent who can’t come up with a decent joke. Continue reading

Justin Timberlake-Man of the Woods

 

              This is not the folktronica reinvention we were promised.  Justin Timberlake’s Man of the Woods was hyped to sound like it was his 22, A Million.  To be fair, this was all speculation; all we had confirmed was that this was going to be a return to Timberlake’s Tennessee roots.  In a sense, it succeeds. JT has gone bro-country; save for some of the extra synth’s thrown in.  Man of the Woods is an earnest attempt at artistry, but it sees Timberlake slouching into his iconic status. Continue reading

The Spook School-Could It Be Different?

There aren’t many artists that can recapture the catchy, emotional energy that bands like Modern Baseball and Diet Cig have been able to in the past few years.  Glasgow’s The Spook School fully encompass all the best qualities of both those bands on their latest album Could It Be Different?  They balance between sincere feelings and snarky adolescent wit within a bright pop-punk frame that borrows from classics as much as it does from emo revivalists.  It’s an overwhelmingly good album in a genre that has more and more felt exhausted of its creativity. Continue reading

A Futile and Stupid Gesture (dir. David Wain)

It’s not surprising that a biopic about National Lampoon founder Doug Kenney (played by Will Forte) would come out right now.  With Netflix’s dedication to weekly comedy specials, the importance of SNL, and the evolution of social-media to share comedy, of course, it’s timely to release a movie about one of the most influential forces in comedy.  A Futile and Stupid Gesture is both hilarious and dramatic, bringing to life both the excitement and burden of living in the comedy world.  While easily watchable and very entertaining, there are certain aspects that leave the audience a little confused and unsure of how they’re supposed to feel.

Spoilers[i]: Continue reading