Jonas Brothers-Happiness Begins

In 2009, if you had told me that I’d willing listen to a Jonas Brothers record in 2019, I’d probably say something that I’d be ashamed of in 2019.  While it’s difficult for me to discuss what qualified as insanely popular and well-discussed pop music at that point in time, I can tell you that the Jonas Brothers were hits in the eighth and ninth grade circa 2007-2009.  Their 2019 return as a mature pop act is an easy sell to nostalgic twenty-somethings and a chance for reassessment from pretentious Marilyn Manson fans.  With Happiness Begins, the trio’s reinvention cements their credibility beyond teenie-boppers, but does little to set them apart from their new contemporaries. Continue reading

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Another One Bites the Dust: Letting Charles Manson’s Celebrity Die

Despite being the cause of at least five deaths, Charlie Manson is considered to be one of the most popular killers in culture today. A part of me desperately wishes that serial killer popularity wasn’t a thing, but here we are in 2017 with fan clubs for convicted serial killers, rapists and cult leaders, or men like Manson, who happen to be all three.  In what is only going to be sudden spike in Manson popularity, I think people forget that this was exactly what Manson wanted from the beginning.  The whole world to look at him as someone special and as we continue to feed into the criminal turned celebrity, I think it’s important to take a moment and reflect on a society that worships people like him. Continue reading

Charles Manson-Lie (The Love and Terror Cult)

The human fascination with death and murder takes us all down strange rabbit holes.  It’s hard for some people to resist watching Law & Order, some of us have libraries with Helter Skelter or Zodiac, and some of us spend most of our work day listening to murder podcasts.  With a demographic that can sometimes skew down the darker path of life, it’s not difficult to see an audience for Charles Manson’s Lie album.  Manson’s relationship with music is one of the largest parts of his legacy that will surely be discussed for years to come. Continue reading

25 Christmas Songs for People Who Hate Christmas Songs

I don’t remember when I started to hate Christmas music, but if I had to guess, it probably started when I first heard the broken skis variation on “Dashing Through the Snow.”  Don’t get me wrong, I’m no Scrooge.  I adore the holiday, the Christmas specials, and everything it means, but I turn into a real Grinch, if you ask me to sing “Jingle Bells.”  Even though there’s nothing more that I’d love than to chuck the copies of Sounds of the Season: NBC Holiday Edition or  Michael Bublé’s Christmas from my parents’ CD collection, there are a handful of Christmas songs I like, albeit most of them humorous or less traditional tracks.  Therefore, I opted to find 25 Christmas songs that I actually enjoy.  Here are the definitive BurgerADay Christmas jams.

  1. The Mountain Goats-“Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas”


If you’re like me, you’re of the opinion that everything John Darnielle touches turns to gold, and the Mountain Goats could even make a Christmas song bearable.  I only like this song when the Mountain Goats are playing it. Continue reading

Monday Mixtape 10/17: (Bob Dylan, Aimee Mann, Kevin Devine, Black Kids!)

Paul McCartney feat. Rihanna-“FourFiveSeconds”

This weekend saw the wrap up of the Desert Trip festival in Indio, California.  McCartney was probably one of the biggest draws when the festival was announced, but he brought out a special guest who is definitely more suited for Coachella.

 

Aimee Mann-“Can’t You Tell”

The 30 Days, 30 Songs campaign has been a recurring story here at BurgerADay for the past week.  Aimee Mann’s song is easily one of the best songs to come out of it.  It’s a driving number that takes on a much sadder point-of-view that almost forces the listener to emphasize with the Republican Presidential Candidate

 

The Who-“Baba O’Riley”

Another “Oldchella” act.  While The Beatles and Rolling Stones are essentials for any music fan, I always preferred Pete Townshend, Roger Daltrey, John Entwhistle and Keith Moon growing up.  It’s hard to find a song as timeless as “Baba O’Riley.”  That synthesizer riff is one of the most iconic in history.

Kevin Devine-“Freddie Gray Blues”

 

As the release of Kevin Devine’s Instigator draws closer, we’ve been treated to the album stream.  Devine did release this track right after the murder of Freddie Gray, and it’s just as haunting.  Devine both acknowledges his white privilege and relationships with cops, and it’s chilling.

Moose Blood-“Honey”

The UK pop-punk outfit has just embarked on a US tour opening for The Wonder Years.  Where their first album had more emo-influence, Blush is sugary sweet pop-punk, and the lead single is probably the best song from the album.  The band is sure to be exciting. 

Modern Baseball-“Phone Tag”

Another tour-opener.  Modern Baseball has just kicked off a tour with Brand New and The Front Bottoms.  While their setlist mostly features takes from the excellent Holy Ghost, I’ve been revisiting their B-sides.  This reworking of “It’s Cold Out Here” is a nice change of pace, and the altered lyrics at the end are much better than the original.

Brand New-“Not the Sun”

Brand New has been playing Devil and God front to back on their current tour, forcing me to revisit the album.  While the most popular tracks never fail to entertain, I’m pleasantly reminded how great songs like “Welcome to Bangkok” or “Not the Sun” are.

Bob Dylan-“Desolation Row”

The biggest music news story this week has been about the Nobel Prize winner.  Dylan’s poetry is perhaps best summed up in this song, and here’s a video from this weekend’s Desert Trip.

Black Kids-“Obligatory Drugs”

Black Kids are back with this fun-as-hell track.  “Obligatory Drugs” is a dancey, indie-rock song with an undeniable hook.  I’m definitely in.