PWR BTTM’s Ben Hopkins Accused of Sexual Assault

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Ben Hopkins of queer-punk duo PWR BTTM has recently come under fire following accusations of sexual assault.  Following the accusations, the band released a statement, a number of shows have been dropped, Salty Artist Management have dropped them, touring members and support have dropped off their upcoming tour, and a woman came forward in an anonymous interview as a victim of Hopkins.  The band’s sophomore album Pageant was released today.

National Sexual Assault Hotline – (800) 656-4673
The Trevor Project – (866) 488-7386
LGBT National Help Center – (888) 843-4564
National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs – (212) 714-1141

The 11 Best Two-Piece Rock Bands

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There are plenty of duos that may as well stand for the whole band: Lennon & McCartney, Page & Plant, Axl & Slash, the lineage goes on.  Even though these pairs tend to overshadow their rhythm sections, with few exceptions, people rarely consider these pairs to be the complete band.  Of the Beatles, Zeppelin, and Guns N’ Roses, Guns is probably the only act you struggled to name all the members because there are 5, not 4.  Of course, the power duos never stopped existing.  Marilyn Manson, Fall Out Boy, and Modern Baseball are all bands that have two distinctive figureheads for their bands.

Even though each of those bands are special and have aspects that make them stand out, there’s a certain credibility to bands that cut the size of those lineups in half.  Two pieces aren’t exactly new to rock music, but since the early 2000’s, a band can pull the simple trick of consisting of only two members, and critics are bound to have some sense of respect for it.  Now, we can sit here and argue the merits of abandoning a bassist, but the fact of the matter is: most two pieces are pretty good.  Here’s a list of the essential two pieces throughout rock history. Continue reading

‘Our First 100 Days’ Recap: 1/20-1/27

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Well, it’s been a week.  During his first week in office, President Trump has reinstated the Global Gag Rule, argued about the size of the crowd at his inauguration, confirmed that he plans to build the wall, and silenced various government agencies from making official statements.  While there’s already been a number of cons, there have been some good things to come out of it: the Women’s March, the punch heard ’round the world, and our first week of songs from Our First 100 Days.

Our First 100 Days is a compilation in a similar vein as the 30 Days, 30 Songs campaign.  Every day for Trump’s first 100 days in office, a new song will be added the the campaign’s bandcamp page.  The whole comp can be pre-ordered for $30 with all funds going towards organizations that Trump’s policies will affect.  It already boasts some artists that have released some of the best albums of last year, and it promises more big named artists.
As is often the case with large scale comps, Our First 100 Days is something of a mixed bag ranging in quality.  During the first week, just about everything is tolerable, at the very least.  The only real clunky song is Avey Tare’s demo of “Visit the Dojo,” which is mind-numbingly annoying.  The only other real complaints that could be made are about Women’s “Group Transport Hall,” which is too atmospheric for my taste, and Jason Molina’s “Royko.”  Molina’s song isn’t my cup of tea, but it also seems somewhat difficult to put a man who’s been dead for four years on a political compilation.  That being said, I never knew Molina’s politics, so who am I to judge?  Meat Wave’s “Dogs at Night” is another that is fine as a song, but there’s not much special about it.
Angel Olsen’s introductory song is a great little song.  Production wise, it bears a strong resemblance to David Bowie’s “Space Oddity.”  The song is surprisingly apolitical for the first song on an actively political compilation.  That being said, Olsen’s delivery and instrumentation at the beginning of the song sounds militant.  It is a sweet little number that would have easily fit on My Woman though.
PWR BTTM’s “Vacation” is easily the best.  The song begins like a sad, lazy song, but it ends with passionate shrieking.  Although this seems to be simply another unrequited love song, the sentiment of “it’s going to be a long day,” certainly echoes the feelings of the past week.
Suuns and Tilman Robinson & Luke Howard’s songs are the most interesting sonically.  Robinson & Howard’s “Requiem for 2016” is a dreary classical composition that certainly reflects some of the feelings of disassociation and numbness.  Suuns’ “Native Tongues” captures a similar emotion, but the distorted screeches in the background along with the processed vocals certainly seem more accurate to what we’re living in now.

16 Odd Ends from 2016

Summing it all up.

 

Even though we’ve all been talking about how 2016 is the worst year ever, this year did see a lot of good coming out of it.  Don’t get me wrong, 2016 sucked, but it does seem like the arts flourished.  We got Stranger Things this year!  I’ve heard the new Star Wars is pretty good, and I don’t even like Star Wars.  I saw Brand New, The Front Bottoms, and Modern Baseball twice each!  Those aren’t bad things.  Since music is where my passion lies (and I’m not that original), I wanted to post BurgerADay’s official standings on Pitchfork’s normal and bizarre year end lists.

1.Best Lyric of 2016: The Front Bottoms-“Joanie”

            “I finally am what I am, a fucking bag of bags”


Although The Front Bottoms are stealing a page from Katy Perry’s book here, Needy When I’m Needy provided some of the most refreshing, fun songs of the year.  When Brian Sella sings that he’s just “a fucking bag of bags,” it’s absurdist but enticing.  It’s a line that you can’t help but to sing along to.  Unlike Perry, I’ve never “felt like a plastic bag/drifting through the wind,” but I’ve totally felt like “a fucking bag of bags.”

2.Best Rap Album of 2016: Kanye West-The Life of Pablo Continue reading