Monday Mixtape: 10/3 (The Weeknd, Bon Iver, Nick Drake)

The Weeknd-“False Alarm”

Following an electric SNL performance, it seems The Weeknd’s Starboy will be one of the strongest in R&B this year.  It’s one of the fastest, heaviest loaded songs, creating a dark club track.

 

Bon Iver-“715-CRSSKS”

This haunting auto-tuned anthem has some of the heaviest emotions on all of Bon Iver’s latest release.  Justin Vernon lets the weight of the world fall on the listener as his vocals become more distorted and confusing until he’s shouting during the song’s outro.

 

Slaughter Beach, Dog-“Jobs”
https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/album=1104672169/size=large/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/tracklist=false/artwork=small/track=1130357777/transparent=true/
Painting an image of the fictitious Slaughter Beach’s thriving underbelly, this is one of the most varied pieces on Jake Ewald’s debut solo album.  It’s an infectious track with one of the best opening lines of the year.

 

Bad Religion-“Fuck Armageddon…This is Hell”

 

As debates have been recapped, we keep alluding to the end of the world with both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.  This is a fitting song for an election year, and for the fact that I’m seeing Bad Religion tomorrow night.

 

Brand New-“Limousine”

 

The Long Island hometown heroes have just announced that they will be playing this iconic album from front to back on their forthcoming tour with Modern Baseball and The Front Bottoms.  This is one of the best songs from Devil and God and sure to be explosive as always.

 

Diet Cig-“Harvard”

Speaking of The Front Bottoms, I’ve been reviewing their Champagne Jam lineup, and I’m always thrilled to see some of New Paltz’s finest on the list.  This punky, emotional jam is a must-listen from the duo.

 

Against Me!-“I Still Love You Julie”


Another prep for Tuesday night’s show-I have my fingers crossed to hear a couple classic Reinventing Axl Rose songs on Tuesday from Against Me!

 

Nick Drake-“Day is Done”

 

Nick Drake’s eerie folk tune is fitting for the rainy fall weather New York has seen this weekend.  As October rears its head, Nick Drake’s mournful folk is always suited to the occasion.

 

Bon Iver-22, A Million

jv1

The way I see it, Justin Vernon was walking down a Wisconsin road and reach a place where two roads diverged.  He could have created a standard, mostly acoustic follow up to Bon Iver, Bon Iver or he could make a batshit insane electronica album with titles that include symbols for sigma and infinity.  Justin Vernon opted for the latter.

Upon first hearing some of the earliest tracks released, it would be easy to concede that Justin Vernon had lost the essence of what Bon Iver is.  He has simply reimagined what it means to be Bon Iver.  He’s still given us a concept record as solid as For Emma, Forever Ago, just with much less acoustic guitar.  This album sees him exploring mortality, religion and aging, which makes all the distortion, samples and autotune seem all the more fitting.  Bon Iver still has all the warm production, virtuosity and songwriting that make those first two albums such great albums, but he does it with more of a focus on electronics.  Vernon hasn’t abandoned live instruments entirely though.  The saxophone work on “22 (OVER S∞∞N)” and “____45_____” steals the show, creating distorted, glitchy jazz.  “____45_____” also has some sweet banjo at the end.  Original instrumentation and interesting songwriting is definitely not an issue for Justin Vernon.

Bon Iver’s hip hop and R&B collaborations have shown some influence, as this is probably his most soulful record.  Justin Vernon’s signature falsetto still shows on songs like “33 “GOD.””  Unlike his previous work, he sings as if he’s a rapper spitting a sick verse here.  A songs like “8 (circle)” and “00000 Million” have him singing autotuned soul anthems.  It’s very similar to what Kanye West and Chance the Rapper have done with their recent releases.

While there are moments that seem cold and emotionless on this album such as “22 (OVER S∞∞N),” 22, A Million sees Justin Vernon revealing some of his most heart wrenching emotions.  This is most evident during the outro to “715 – CRΣΣKS” where Vernon is practically screaming, “God damn, turn around now.  You were my A-Team.”  “10 d E A T h b R E a s T ⚄ ⚄” also sees Vernon vocalizing frustrating during a heavy track.  Most of the album seems to see Vernon trying angrily to make numerical values out of life, but the closing track’s calm piano and refrain of “the days have no numbers” seems to show that he came to grips with an existential dread.  He notes that sometimes you have to let harm in.

22, A Million is definitely controversial for Bon Iver fans.  It’s much more ethereal than what it seems, because it merges all the different worlds that Bon Iver has been involved in.  Had Bon Iver done this as an acoustic guitar folk album, it would have been good, but since he traveled down a new path, it’s incredible.  Two roads diverged in a Wisconsin wood, and Justin Vernon took the path less traveled by, and that has made 22 millions differences.

New Music from Bon Iver


For the first new music from Bon Iver in 5 years, this should not be terribly surprising.  Justin Vernon has collaborated with the likes of Kanye and James Blake.  The instrumentals on his new tracks don’t sound like the folk darling we’ve come to know and love.  The warm electronics do compliment Vernon’s voice though.  “22 (OVER S∞∞N)” finds a happy medium for fans of For Emma, Forever Ago, but “10 d E A T h b R E a s T ⚄ ⚄” is much more distorted.  The instrumental of “10 d E A T h b R E a s T ⚄ ⚄” though features some sweet, welcoming saxophone work, which contrasts Vernon’s distorted vocal takes.  Bon Iver’s 22, A Million is sure to be interesting, probably excellent.

 

James will be patient, and James will be fine on Twitter.